oponok
oponok:


audreyheckburn: I love documentaries, and I bet you guys do too. So here are 25 films that may or may not blow your mind, entertain, and even educate you.

Helvetica: A documentary about typography, graphic design, and global visual culture.Andy Warhol: A four hour documentary on the famous pop artist, it argues that Warhol was the greatest artist of the second half of the 20th Century.Gambling in Las Vegas: Louis Theroux heads to Las Vegas, to reveal the world behind the myths of casino culture.Man with a Movie Camera: Soviet pioneer documentary film, newsreel director and cinema theorist; Dziga Vertov’s experimental 1929 silent documentary film.Child of Rage: Beth Thomas is a child of about six who suffered from reactive attachment disorder, had urges to harm her brother, and her road to recovery. Watch in shock and horror as she nonchalantly describes what she feels and how she wants to hurt those around her.Suicide Forest in Japan: Aokigahara is the most popular place to commit suicide in Japan after being the setting for a suicide between lovers in a 1960 novel.The Aristocrats: The Aristocrats is a “inside joke” in the comedy and show business industry dating back all the way to Vaudeville. It is well known for elements of various taboo behaviors. The entire documentary is just of famous comedians telling the joke.Beauty is Embarrassing: Beauty Is Embarrassing is a funny, irreverent, joyful and inspiring documentary featuring the life and current times of one of America’s most important artists, Wayne White.Dear Zachary: In 2001, Andrew Bagby, a medical resident, is murdered not long after breaking up with his girlfriend. Soon after, when she announces she’s pregnant, one of Andrew’s many close friends, Kurt Kuenne, begins this film, a gift to the child.The Bridge: The Golden Gate Bridge is one of the most popular places for suicide in the world. In 2004, a camera was set up and captured a number of suicides. The film also contains interviews with family and friends of some of the identified people who had thrown themselves from the bridge.Blackfish: focuses on Tilikum, an orca held by SeaWorld, and the controversy over captive killer whales.How to Survive a Plague: How to Survive a Plague is a 2012 American documentary film about the early years of the AIDS epidemic, and the efforts of ACT UP and TAG.Room 237: Many cult movies have their own radical interpretations but none as rich and far-ranging as Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining. In this documentary, we hear from people who believed they have decoded the far-reaching theories, hidden symbols and messages buried in the late director’s film.Secret of the Wild Child: A documentary on Genie, a girl who spent the first thirteen years of her life locked in a room.Jiro Dreams Of Sushi: The film follows Jiro Ono , an 85-year-old sushi master and owner of Sukiyabashi Jiro, a Michelin three-star restaurant, on his continuing quest to perfect the art of sushi.The Act of Killing: A documentary which challenges former Indonesian death-squad leaders to reenact their mass-killings in whichever cinematic genres they wish, including classic Hollywood crime scenarios and lavish musical numbers.A Band Called Death: Before there was punk, there was a band called Death.The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975: a documentary film, directed by Göran Olsson, that examines the evolution of the Black Power Movement in American society from 1967 to 1975.Style Wars: Style Wars is a 1983 documentary on hip hop culture, directed by Tony Silver and produced in collaboration with Henry Chalfant. The film has an emphasis on graffiti, although bboying and rapping are covered to a lesser extent.Marwencol: After a vicious attacks leaves him brain-damaged and broke, Mark Hogancamp seeks recovery in “Marwencol”, a 1/6th scale World War II-era town he creates in his backyard.Into the Abyss: Conversations with death row inmate Michael Perry and those affected by his crime serve as an examination of why people - and the state - kill.Benji: Benji is about the life and death of Ben Wilson, a resident of Chicago’s South Side. In 1984, his senior year of high school and the year of his murder, he was regarded as the best basketball prospect in the country. And then he was shot to death during an altercation near his school, the Simeon Career Academy. Chike and Coodie’s film documents the aftermath of the shooting.The Imposter: A documentary centered on a young Frenchman who claims to a grieving Texas family that he is their 16-year-old son who has been missing for 3 years.Profit Motive and the Whispering Wind: Stones do the speaking in John Gianvito’s stirring experimental doc, composed entirely of images of marked and unmarked grave sites across the United States. Tracing a quietly bracing history of the American Left (we visit the resting places of, among others, Eugene V. Debs and Elizabeth Cady Stanton), the film is an ode to the power of protest.A Grin Without a Cat: A Grin Without a Cat is a 1977 French essay film by Chris Marker. It focuses on global political turmoil in the 1960s and 70s, particularly the rise of the New Left in France and the development of socialist movements in Latin America.



 Man With a Movie Camera  is simply one of the most influential films ever made. It’s basically a 50 minute music video that takes you from birth to death and through the machinations of Soviet society.

Dear Zackary is a personal favorite. It’s a very heavy engaging, devastating story, but there’s so much heart behind it. The last twenty minutes will leave you an emotional wreck in all kinds of ways.

Marwencol  and The Act of Killing  are excellent, and, while not Herzog’s best doc, Into The Abyss  is definitely worth seeing.

oponok:

audreyheckburnI love documentaries, and I bet you guys do too. So here are 25 films that may or may not blow your mind, entertain, and even educate you.

Helvetica: A documentary about typography, graphic design, and global visual culture.
Andy Warhol: A four hour documentary on the famous pop artist, it argues that Warhol was the greatest artist of the second half of the 20th Century.
Gambling in Las Vegas: Louis Theroux heads to Las Vegas, to reveal the world behind the myths of casino culture.
Man with a Movie Camera: Soviet pioneer documentary film, newsreel director and cinema theorist; Dziga Vertov’s experimental 1929 silent documentary film.
Child of Rage: Beth Thomas is a child of about six who suffered from reactive attachment disorder, had urges to harm her brother, and her road to recovery. Watch in shock and horror as she nonchalantly describes what she feels and how she wants to hurt those around her.
Suicide Forest in Japan: Aokigahara is the most popular place to commit suicide in Japan after being the setting for a suicide between lovers in a 1960 novel.
The Aristocrats: The Aristocrats is a “inside joke” in the comedy and show business industry dating back all the way to Vaudeville. It is well known for elements of various taboo behaviors. The entire documentary is just of famous comedians telling the joke.
Beauty is Embarrassing: Beauty Is Embarrassing is a funny, irreverent, joyful and inspiring documentary featuring the life and current times of one of America’s most important artists, Wayne White.
Dear Zachary: In 2001, Andrew Bagby, a medical resident, is murdered not long after breaking up with his girlfriend. Soon after, when she announces she’s pregnant, one of Andrew’s many close friends, Kurt Kuenne, begins this film, a gift to the child.
The Bridge: The Golden Gate Bridge is one of the most popular places for suicide in the world. In 2004, a camera was set up and captured a number of suicides. The film also contains interviews with family and friends of some of the identified people who had thrown themselves from the bridge.
Blackfish: focuses on Tilikum, an orca held by SeaWorld, and the controversy over captive killer whales.
How to Survive a Plague: How to Survive a Plague is a 2012 American documentary film about the early years of the AIDS epidemic, and the efforts of ACT UP and TAG.
Room 237: Many cult movies have their own radical interpretations but none as rich and far-ranging as Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining. In this documentary, we hear from people who believed they have decoded the far-reaching theories, hidden symbols and messages buried in the late director’s film.
Secret of the Wild Child: A documentary on Genie, a girl who spent the first thirteen years of her life locked in a room.
Jiro Dreams Of Sushi: The film follows Jiro Ono , an 85-year-old sushi master and owner of Sukiyabashi Jiro, a Michelin three-star restaurant, on his continuing quest to perfect the art of sushi.
The Act of Killing: A documentary which challenges former Indonesian death-squad leaders to reenact their mass-killings in whichever cinematic genres they wish, including classic Hollywood crime scenarios and lavish musical numbers.
A Band Called Death: Before there was punk, there was a band called Death.
The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975: a documentary film, directed by Göran Olsson, that examines the evolution of the Black Power Movement in American society from 1967 to 1975.
Style Wars: Style Wars is a 1983 documentary on hip hop culture, directed by Tony Silver and produced in collaboration with Henry Chalfant. The film has an emphasis on graffiti, although bboying and rapping are covered to a lesser extent.
Marwencol: After a vicious attacks leaves him brain-damaged and broke, Mark Hogancamp seeks recovery in “Marwencol”, a 1/6th scale World War II-era town he creates in his backyard.
Into the Abyss: Conversations with death row inmate Michael Perry and those affected by his crime serve as an examination of why people - and the state - kill.
Benji: Benji is about the life and death of Ben Wilson, a resident of Chicago’s South Side. In 1984, his senior year of high school and the year of his murder, he was regarded as the best basketball prospect in the country. And then he was shot to death during an altercation near his school, the Simeon Career Academy. Chike and Coodie’s film documents the aftermath of the shooting.
The Imposter: A documentary centered on a young Frenchman who claims to a grieving Texas family that he is their 16-year-old son who has been missing for 3 years.
Profit Motive and the Whispering Wind: Stones do the speaking in John Gianvito’s stirring experimental doc, composed entirely of images of marked and unmarked grave sites across the United States. Tracing a quietly bracing history of the American Left (we visit the resting places of, among others, Eugene V. Debs and Elizabeth Cady Stanton), the film is an ode to the power of protest.
A Grin Without a Cat: A Grin Without a Cat is a 1977 French essay film by Chris Marker. It focuses on global political turmoil in the 1960s and 70s, particularly the rise of the New Left in France and the development of socialist movements in Latin America.

Man With a Movie Camera is simply one of the most influential films ever made. It’s basically a 50 minute music video that takes you from birth to death and through the machinations of Soviet society. Dear Zackary is a personal favorite. It’s a very heavy engaging, devastating story, but there’s so much heart behind it. The last twenty minutes will leave you an emotional wreck in all kinds of ways. Marwencol and The Act of Killing are excellent, and, while not Herzog’s best doc, Into The Abyss is definitely worth seeing.
npr
nprbooks:

Our very own David Green got to hang out with JOHN WATERS and talk about his new book, Carsick — I am so jealous, I think I’m gonna run out and die for art!

On the people he met along the way and whether he turned them into movie characters
I didn’t have to turn them into extreme characters to be interesting to me. What was interesting to me was how matter-of-fact they were about being kinda great, and being accepting and being completely unjudgmental, but at the same time trying to help people — that farmer that gave me money, or that other woman who wouldn’t leave until I took the money. …
It reaffirmed my belief in the goodness of people. They treated me very nicely — that had nothing to do with any kind of fame or seeing me on a talk show or that kind of stuff, so that was very comforting to me. Now, some of the people when they would ask me what I do, I would tell them and they didn’t even believe me.
But I didn’t care, I mean, I wanted to talk about them. And the ones that did, then I’d give them what they want. I’d tell them anecdotes about movie stars and everything they wanted to hear. That’s fair. That’s my job! I got picked up hitchhiking! Your job is to talk. Or have sex. And no one asked.

— Petra

nprbooks:

Our very own David Green got to hang out with JOHN WATERS and talk about his new bookCarsick — I am so jealous, I think I’m gonna run out and die for art!

On the people he met along the way and whether he turned them into movie characters

I didn’t have to turn them into extreme characters to be interesting to me. What was interesting to me was how matter-of-fact they were about being kinda great, and being accepting and being completely unjudgmental, but at the same time trying to help people — that farmer that gave me money, or that other woman who wouldn’t leave until I took the money. …

It reaffirmed my belief in the goodness of people. They treated me very nicely — that had nothing to do with any kind of fame or seeing me on a talk show or that kind of stuff, so that was very comforting to me. Now, some of the people when they would ask me what I do, I would tell them and they didn’t even believe me.

But I didn’t care, I mean, I wanted to talk about them. And the ones that did, then I’d give them what they want. I’d tell them anecdotes about movie stars and everything they wanted to hear. That’s fair. That’s my job! I got picked up hitchhiking! Your job is to talk. Or have sex. And no one asked.

— Petra